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Too often, good business advice does not translate into good business practice.  How many times have business experts written about how important it is for CEOs to be part of the conversation (online and off-line) with consumers, customers, vendors, industry influencers, employees and competitors?  There is so much to be learned by listening to suggestions and complaints from customers, first hand.  And, do you really know what your competitors may be doing to steal your competitive edge and your customers? Have I gotten your attention, yet?
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One of the acknowledged challenges of midsize businesses is the proliferation of YES people on their growing staff.  Yes people. You know the type.  They will agree with almost any idea their boss blurts out whether it is –“culous” of either the genius or ridiculous kind.  The YES person seeks to please and impress his or her bosses hoping to seek favor with them; but they are not doing anyone any favors by removing themselves from the good business decision-making equation. None whatsoever!
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In early July, we are launching a new survey of the midmarket - HEALTH OF THE MIDMARKET SURVEY - to profile various midsize companies, the actions they take and the outcomes they achieve.  This will enable the comparison of various types of middle market companies and inform them of the actions that will achieve certain desired outcomes. The survey is designed to be useful to a current CEO of a midsize company and to the many advisors and parties interested in the success of midsize companies.
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By Ram V. Iyer Many large companies have moved into the midmarket because they see it as “untapped.” Most are selling old formulas or large company formulas that are downsized for the midmarket. Many of the largest providers do not think much beyond the product or service their company sells or try to gain an understanding of the needs of the midmarket. Too few of them seem to recognize the various midmarket segments and how to really help them. 
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Are you really as smart as you think you are? Do people who surround you constantly sing your praises? Do you make more bad decisions than you’d like?
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Some CEOs and business leaders do not understand the differences between B2B and B2C worlds. Many leaders have a difficult time making the much-needed adjustments to be successful when they move from the B2C to the B2B world. Understanding the differences is essential to yielding predictable results on all Go-to-Market activities including: strategy, marketing, sales, product development and service.  
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Do you believe that 96% of the midmarket WORLDWIDE have already implemented big data tools or will very soon? 
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When you are the big fish in a little pond, it’s easy to get caught up in your own watering hole and lose sight of the big changes in nearby ponds, lakes, rivers and the ocean (see related cartoon)!
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Many dominant leaders (or single business owners) become inflated optimists when there are no truth tellers around them.  Cheap money makes most human beings irrational and big ideas make us salivate at the prospects of growing revenues, profits and valuations. The middle market has a number of dominant leaders who fit this profile and tend to ‘bite off more than they can chew’.  They tend to launch BIG projects - projects that can ‘kill’.
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Midmarket companies are grownup startups.  Many are centered on the ‘superman’ or ‘superwoman’ founder who is in the ‘middle of everything’.  When you are in startup mode or small, it made sense to ensure that everybody was pulling in the same direction and the founder knew what was going on.  As the company grows, you hear complaints about the founder – “He’s a control freak.  Everything needs to go through him.”; or, “We don’t have a process for that, Jane does it”; or “We are all stret
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